Project Runway Recap: Season Fourteen, Episode Three

This week’s episode of Project Runway is ending as I type LAST week’s recap (I’ll never be a professional blogger – my turnover time is FAR too long but I’ve been out and about doing “life things” so I guess that’s better anyway, huh?). Let’s hope this week I get the recap done quickly… perhaps I’ll carve out some time on Saturday.

This week the designers were taken to a cruise ship and given a task in which they had to work in pairs. Each team created one look that took an exotic destination and invoked that area. Of course, drama ensued, and I ignored it (honestly I was watching it on an internet connection so slow I got frustrated and just kind of tried to fast forward to the runway.

Amanda & Gabrielle - The team worked well together but this look was awful, in the end.  Any guesses on the locale?  South of France.  The top was awkwardly shaped, and had a sweeping front to it that didn't really go with the short back.

Amanda & Gabrielle – The team worked well together but this look was awful, in the end. Any guesses on the locale? South of France. The top was awkwardly shaped, and had a sweeping front to it that didn’t really go with the short back.

Ashley & Candice - They used the little details of Venice in their look (i.e. the gondolier shirt) and it was highly praised, but I just didn't get it.  The pants seem really odd, and the whole look overall just doesn't seem to work (maybe it's looking at it in the picture and on the bad connection I had).

Ashley & Candice – They used the little details of Venice in their look (i.e. the gondolier shirt) and it was highly praised, but I just didn’t get it. The pants seem really odd, and the whole look overall just doesn’t seem to work (maybe it’s looking at it in the picture and on the bad connection I had).

Blake & Kelly - Greek Isles.  Enough said.  They certainly evoked them.

Blake & Kelly – Greek Isles. Enough said. They certainly evoked them.

Edmond & Hanmiao - You can definitely see the influence of the Caribbean in theory, but it just didn't work out in practice.

Edmond & Hanmiao – You can definitely see the influence of the Caribbean in theory, but it just didn’t work out in practice.

Jake & Lindsey - They had Hong Kong, which you can clearly see in the look (even if it seems a little too literal to me).  This was the team that didn't work well together AT ALL but ended up having a really good look in the end.

Jake & Lindsey – They had Hong Kong, which you can clearly see in the look (even if it seems a little too literal to me). This was the team that didn’t work well together AT ALL but ended up having a really good look in the end.

Joseph & Merline - Mail order bride from St. Petersberg, perhaps?

Joseph & Merline – Mail order bride from St. Petersberg, perhaps?

Laurie & Swapnil - They did a nice job.  It definitely looks India, but again the fit of the pants seemed strange to me.

Laurie & Swapnil – They did a nice job. It definitely looks India, but again the fit of the pants seemed strange to me.

Winner: Ashley & Candice
Out: Hanmiao

2015 Reading Challenge: Book # 28 – A Book of Short Stories

I was avoiding reading a book of short stories for as long as I could in this challenge. I don’t mind short stories on their own, but I’m not a huge fan of reading them in quick succession in a book. However, it needed to be done. For my book of short stories I chose Interpreter of Maladies, by Jhumpa Lahiri. A few years ago I read The Namesake and enjoyed Lahiri’s writing style so I thought I might like her book of short stories.

I was correct, for the most part. The first story had – and held – my attention the whole way through. It was the story of a couple who had lost their first child in a stillbirth. Since the tragedy, they lost touch with each other and it takes a few evening’s of losing power in their home to reconnect – however, it is not enough to make them stay together as in the end they seem to be parting.

However, from the first story, my interest waned and returned, waned and returned, depending on which story I was reading. Lahiri takes the reader to many locations in her stories, but at the heart of them are Indian characters. Some are still living in their native country, while others have been Americanized. Still others are a mix of the two – Americanized children with more traditional parents. It was a look at the complexities of relationships, culture, culture shock, etc. At the heart of each story there seems to be a fractured relationship of some kind, or a desire to connect with another person, whether close or otherwise. In one story, a young mother confesses to a tour guide that one of her son’s does not belong to her husband (a fact that no one besides herself knew) in an effort to make a connection, hear a kind word of reassurance. In another, a family takes in a man who has temporarily lost touch with his own family due to war threats (though he is eventually reunited with them).

In one of the stories, a character states, “I know what it’s like to be lonely” and that definitely seems like the theme of all of these stories.

One of the things that bugs me about short stories sometimes is the way they end so quickly, or often ambiguously. There are plenty that feel like a complete thought at the end, but a lot of these had a sadder ending, making the reader think about the situations and wondering where these characters will go next.

However, as mentioned earlier, I find Lahiri’s writing style pleasant and easy to read, so all in all this was a quick read for the challenge.

Other Posts in this Series:
Books #25-27: A Trilogy – The James Women Trilogy, by Eric Praschan
Book # 24: A Book Made into a Movie – This Is Where I Leave You, by Jonathan Tropper
Book # 23: A Book with a One Word Title – Us, by David Nicholls
Book # 22: A Book with a Love Triangle – Euphoria, by Lily King
Book # 21: A Book Set in Your Hometown – The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells, by Andrew Sean Greer
Book # 20: A Book with Nonhuman Characters – Gods Behaving Badly, by Marie Phillips
Book # 19: Nonfiction – Gumption, by Nick Offerman
Book # 18: A Book Set During Christmastime – A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens
Book # 17: A Popular Author’s First Book – Carrie, by Stephen King
Book # 16: A Book Based Entirely on It’s Cover – Paper Towns, by John Green
Book # 15: A Book Your Mom Loves – Gone Girl, by Gillian Flynn
Book # 14: A Book Set in a Place You Want to Visit – Beautiful Ruins, by Jess Walter
Book # 13: A Book with a Number in the Title – Eleven, by Mark Watson
Book # 12: A Book by an Author You’ve Never Read – Let’s Cure Diabetes with Owls, by David Sedaris
Book # 11: A Book with a Color in the Title – One Lavender Ribbon, by Heather Burch
Book # 10: A Book at the Bottom of Your To-Read List – If You Were Here, by Jen Lancaster
Book # 9: A Book Set in a Different Country – The Secret Place, by Tana French
Book # 8: A Book with Antonyms in the Title – Together Apart, by Natalie Martin
Book # 7: A Book Set in the Future – Cinder, by Marissa Meyer
Book # 6: A Book By a Female Author – We Have Always Lived in the Castle, by Shirley Jackson
Book # 5: A Book More Than 100 Years Old – The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, by L. Frank Baum
Book # 4: A Play – Pygmalion, by George Bernard Shaw
Book # 3: A Book You Started But Never Finished – The Husband’s Secret, by Liane Moriarty
Book # 2: A Mystery or Thriller – The Silence That Speaks, by Andrea Kane
Book # 1: A Book Published This Year – The Glass Kitchen, by Linda Francis Lee

2015 Reading Challenge: Book # 25, # 26 & # 27 – A Trilogy

Rather than split this into three separate posts, I decided to tackle the trilogy and make it one big post about the series. For this one, I chose The James Women Trilogy, by Eric Praschan. I had never heard of it, but it was $0.99 on Amazon for the entire thing, it sounded interesting, and thus it became a part of this challenge. The trilogy consists of three books (obviously): Therapy for Ghosts, Sleepwalking into Darkness, and The Reckoning. At the heart of the books is Cindy James and her family, who are battling inner demons and working to rid a curse on their family.

Therapy for Ghosts introduces us to Cindy James, a woman who is being haunted by memories of her childhood. She comes from a long line of women who struggle with depression, paranoia and anxiety and have a history of stabbing their husbands because of this. Cindy, however, has repressed all these memories and is working as a psychologist. One day, she starts having episodes that seem like they could be a stroke or a brain tumor but are in fact her simply having a physical reaction to her bad memories. The “ghosts” in the title doesn’t refer to actual ghosts but to demons of the past. She meets Tony, a psychologist she is required to spend time with to deal with her issues. Of course, they eventually fall in love, but that’s an entirely different part of the plot. Together they work through the memories of her childhood and she faces her anger towards her grandmother and mother. Eventually, she comes to terms with it and vows to forgive and move on with her life.

In Sleepwalking into Darkness, it is nineteen years later and Cindy has been doing well. Her demons of the past are dealt with and she lives with Tony, now her husband and daughter, Lexi. Lexi admits to having “dark thoughts.” Cindy receives a mysterious letter from her mother, who has been dead for thirty years, and through this letter and the ensuing macabre scavenger hunt she is sent on, learns she has a half-sister. Cassie Flinder is wife of the Victor Flinder, the corrupt, evil mayor of Chattanooga. She also has a daughter who suffers from sleepwalking episodes and the “dark thoughts” that plague the James women. At the end of this story, the family is reunited briefly only to be thwarted by Victor, who gets what he wants at all costs.

This brings us to the final book, The Reckoning, which breaks the curse. And here’s where the whole purpose of this trilogy baffles me. This entire last book is about saving Cassie, Lucy and Lexi from Victor’s clutches. The author claims that once this happens, the curse on the James women will be broken. But their curse is a mental disorder, not the fact that they all meet and marry the worst men possible.

I actually read this whole trilogy at breakneck speed. Despite the oddities of it, and the asinine descriptions of food for no apparent reason, it was a fast and easy read and it did keep me interested in it. AND it covered three books of the challenge in one fell swoop!

Other Posts in this Series:
Book # 24: A Book Made into a Movie – This is Where I Leave You, by Jonathan Tropper
Book # 23: A Book with a One Word Title – Us, by David Nicholls
Book # 22: A Book with a Love Triangle – Euphoria, by Lily King
Book # 21: A Book Set in Your Hometown – The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells, by Andrew Sean Greer
Book # 20: A Book with Nonhuman Characters – Gods Behaving Badly, by Marie Phillips
Book # 19: Nonfiction – Gumption, by Nick Offerman
Book # 18: A Book Set During Christmastime – A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens
Book # 17: A Popular Author’s First Book – Carrie, by Stephen King
Book # 16: A Book Based Entirely on It’s Cover – Paper Towns, by John Green
Book # 15: A Book Your Mom Loves – Gone Girl, by Gillian Flynn
Book # 14: A Book Set in a Place You Want to Visit – Beautiful Ruins, by Jess Walter
Book # 13: A Book with a Number in the Title – Eleven, by Mark Watson
Book # 12: A Book by an Author You’ve Never Read – Let’s Cure Diabetes with Owls, by David Sedaris
Book # 11: A Book with a Color in the Title – One Lavender Ribbon, by Heather Burch
Book # 10: A Book at the Bottom of Your To-Read List – If You Were Here, by Jen Lancaster
Book # 9: A Book Set in a Different Country – The Secret Place, by Tana French
Book # 8: A Book with Antonyms in the Title – Together Apart, by Natalie Martin
Book # 7: A Book Set in the Future – Cinder, by Marissa Meyer
Book # 6: A Book By a Female Author – We Have Always Lived in the Castle, by Shirley Jackson
Book # 5: A Book More Than 100 Years Old – The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, by L. Frank Baum
Book # 4: A Play – Pygmalion, by George Bernard Shaw
Book # 3: A Book You Started But Never Finished – The Husband’s Secret, by Liane Moriarty
Book # 2: A Mystery or Thriller – The Silence That Speaks, by Andrea Kane
Book # 1: A Book Published This Year – The Glass Kitchen, by Linda Francis Lee

2015 Reading Challenge: Book # 24 – A Book Made into a Movie

Finding a book made into a movie is not remotely difficult.  Deciding whether or not I wanted to go with a movie I haven’t seen or not was another story.  In the end, ultimately I went with This Is Where I Leave You  by Jonathan Tropper, which is a movie I saw last year starring Jason Bateman and Tina Fey.  Since I had seen the movie and knew the general plot line, my goal for reading was to “spot the differences.”

From the beginning, there were some small differences I noticed right away. The last name of the family was different, Tina Fey’s character had an extra kid, and the character named Quinn in the movie is Jen in the book. However, the series of events that set up Judd’s downfall are more or less exactly the same, just a little more fleshed out perhaps: his wife cheats on him with his boss and shortly after, his father passes away and his mother says that his final request was that his wife and children sit shiva.

The book remains largely the same as the movie by the time I hit 25%. The family can’t stand each other as shiva begins, and the stress of it begins to show itself early. Linda and Horry, the mother-and-son neighbors, are present as well as Penny, the ultimate love interest for Judd, though he doesn’t meet her the same way he does in the book. Alice, Judd’s sister-in-law and former girlfriend, is not as pleasant as she is in the movies, though her infertility struggle is still at the heart of her character. Hillary, the matriarch of the family, is just as inappropriate with her kids as she is in the movie (though her boob job in the movie is more recent than in the novel). The story is all there in it’s dysfunctional glory, in some form or another.

The book also delves into more background than a movie has time to, so the reader learns more about the relationship Judd had with many women in the book: Jen, Penny, Alice (whose name is actually Annie in the movie – a detail I only remembered after finishing the whole thing). In fact, one very large difference occurs with Alice – she succeeds in getting Judd to have sex with her after she’s frustrated for not getting pregnant. Movie Alice tries, but Judd refuses. Granted, book Judd attempted to refuse but it somehow happened anyway.

I did enjoy the reference that the mom makes to Jane Fonda, as that’s who played her in the movie.

However, all in all there were no glaring differences. But the problem with reading a book after seeing the movie is that I am anticipating the events and wanting things to speed up until they happen. This becomes even more true when the book is so close to it’s movie counterpart. However, I enjoy the author’s easy style and found myself quickly making my way through this book. Whether you’ve seen the movie or not, it’s worth a read. And I’d definitely like to check out the author’s other novels now.

Other Posts in this Series:
Book # 23: A Book with a One Word Title – Us, by David Nicholls
Book # 22: A Book with a Love Triangle – Euphoria, by Lily King
Book # 21: A Book Set in Your Hometown – The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells, by Andrew Sean Greer
Book # 20: A Book with Nonhuman Characters – Gods Behaving Badly, by Marie Phillips
Book # 19: Nonfiction – Gumption, by Nick Offerman
Book # 18: A Book Set During Christmastime – A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens
Book # 17: A Popular Author’s First Book – Carrie, by Stephen King
Book # 16: A Book Based Entirely on It’s Cover – Paper Towns, by John Green
Book # 15: A Book Your Mom Loves – Gone Girl, by Gillian Flynn
Book # 14: A Book Set in a Place You Want to Visit – Beautiful Ruins, by Jess Walter
Book # 13: A Book with a Number in the Title – Eleven, by Mark Watson
Book # 12: A Book by an Author You’ve Never Read – Let’s Cure Diabetes with Owls, by David Sedaris
Book # 11: A Book with a Color in the Title – One Lavender Ribbon, by Heather Burch
Book # 10: A Book at the Bottom of Your To-Read List – If You Were Here, by Jen Lancaster
Book # 9: A Book Set in a Different Country – The Secret Place, by Tana French
Book # 8: A Book with Antonyms in the Title – Together Apart, by Natalie Martin
Book # 7: A Book Set in the Future – Cinder, by Marissa Meyer
Book # 6: A Book By a Female Author – We Have Always Lived in the Castle, by Shirley Jackson
Book # 5: A Book More Than 100 Years Old – The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, by L. Frank Baum
Book # 4: A Play – Pygmalion, by George Bernard Shaw
Book # 3: A Book You Started But Never Finished – The Husband’s Secret, by Liane Moriarty
Book # 2: A Mystery or Thriller – The Silence That Speaks, by Andrea Kane
Book # 1: A Book Published This Year – The Glass Kitchen, by Linda Francis Lee

Project Runway Recap: Season Fourteen, Episode Two

I’m excited to critique this challenge, as I LOVE the unconventional challenge and that’s in fact what this evening’s episode was all about. The designers visited the Hallmark store and essentially ransacked it for their materials – make a dress out of cards.

(Sidebar: this would’ve been an amazing episode to feature Mayhem from Fashion By Mayhem, the little girl who became famous by making and designing paper dresses with her mom.)

Amanda - If you ask me, someone saw what won last week and tried her best to do the same.  The top was pretty, and a good idea with the lace, but the skirt is just oddly executed.

Amanda – If you ask me, someone saw what won last week and tried her best to do the same. The top was pretty, and a good idea with the lace, but the skirt is just oddly executed.

Ashley - Well, she had a immunity so that was lucky.  Even she admitted a poncho was probably not the best direction to go in with the cards.

Ashley – Well, she had a immunity so that was lucky. Even she admitted a poncho was probably not the best direction to go in with the cards.

Blake - My first thought when this came out was that I thought it looked like something a figure skater would wear.  However, on the right person (i.e. a teenager) this would be cute.

Blake – My first thought when this came out was that I thought it looked like something a figure skater would wear. However, on the right person (i.e. a teenager) this would be cute.

Candice - This was a nice, very cool super hero kind of dress.

Candice – This was a nice, very cool super hero kind of dress.

David - The look of it is great, but he didn't use the cards.

David – The look of it is great, but he didn’t use the cards.

Edmond - LOVE IT!  Making a wedding dress entirely out of cards - awesome!

Edmond – LOVE IT! Making a wedding dress entirely out of cards – awesome! (Sidebar: Edmond is also now standing out as a favorite of mine, design and personality-wise.)

Gabrielle - Ugh... I agree with one of the other designers who said the colors chosen make it look like a giant vagina.

Gabrielle – Ugh… I agree with one of the other designers who said the colors chosen make it look like a giant vagina.

Hanmiao - Whatever.  I liked the little cutesy detail of taking the card out at the top, but are we just going to see box-shaped outfits from her the whole time?

Hanmiao – Whatever. I liked the little cutesy detail of taking the card out at the top, but are we just going to see box-shaped outfits from her the whole time?

Jake - Cute and basic.  Fine.

Jake – Cute and basic. Fine.

Joseph - Again, fine.

Joseph – Again, fine.

Kelly - This reads superhero costume to me (or perhaps something Sporty Spice would wear), but I enjoyed it anyway.  I love the pattern creation on the top.

Kelly – This reads superhero costume to me (or perhaps something Sporty Spice would wear), but I enjoyed it anyway. I love the pattern creation on the top.

Laurie - Cute.  Fine.

Laurie – Cute. Fine.

Lindsay- Not my favorite, but there were little details that worked.

Lindsay- Not my favorite, but there were little details that worked.

Merline - This looks like what it is... a bunch of cards taped together.

Merline – This looks like what it is… a bunch of cards taped together. Seriously, I’m a little shocked she was safe, especially considering the ones they put on the bottom – AND the fact that they had four top garments this time around.

Swapnil - I both like and dislike this one. I'm not a huge fan of the florals on the skirt, but the top is brilliant.  You can't see it in the picture, but the top is a ombre of polka dots and the back is striped, lined up.

Swapnil – I both like and dislike this one. I’m not a huge fan of the florals on the skirt, but the fit and construction are amazing and the top is brilliant. You can’t see it in the picture, but the top is a ombre of polka dots and the back is striped, lined up.

Winner: Edmond
Out:David

As for next week, we have my least favorite type of challenge – a team challenge – and the designers inexplicably spend time on a cruise ship.

Blue Apron Review: Week Nine

Blue Apron week nine looked fantastic in the preview on the site, so I was excited to get the box this week.

  
First up this week, I chose Stir-Fried Ginger-Basil Chicken with Tinkerbell Peppers and Coconut Rice.  First off, Tinkerbell Peppers are adorable!  They’re little tiny peppers that made dainty little rings when cut, and they were a bright and colorful addition to the dish.  The dish overall was so good!  I love ginger and garlic together so this was a guaranteed hit – and cooking the rice in coconut milk was brilliant.  The sausage looking things are actually slices of eggplant, which normally I’m not a fan of but it blended into the flavors of the dish and I didn’t even notice it.

  
Next was Spiced Meatballs with Garlic Toasts & Summer Squash Salad.  I left the spice mix out of the meat mixture before forming the meatballs, so I decided to put it in the sauce instead.  It kind of worked.  Honestly, though these weren’t bad, I think I would’ve preferred them sans the spice mixture.  The meatball mix has Parmesan, breadcrumbs and not which was really satisfying.  The squash salad was good – the vegetable is never my favorite part of any meal and this was no exception but they were very good.  However, I think my favorite part of this meal was that it included garlic toast, which was delicious.  I’ve made it before and it’s very simple – toasted bread with olive oil and then it’s rubbed with garlic after it’s toasted.

  
Last was Salmon & Panzanella with Corn, Shishito Peppers and Thai Basil.  Once again I have to say congratulations, Blue Apron, for converting me into a salmon eater.  Turns out the Caesar salad was not a fluke.  I ate that whole piece of salmon and wasn’t horrified.  Granted I wasn’t super thrilled with it but that’s the case with most fish. But I know it’s good for me, and thus I keep trying it different ways.  The panzanella was really good – the crunchy, garlicky croutons perfectly complemented the vinagary mix of tomatoes, cucumbers, shallots, pepper and corn.

All in all, a good week!

2015 Reading Challenge: Book # 23 – A Book with a One Word Title

One good thing about my terrible habit of starting books and then just leaving them in my Kindle unfinished, is that I was able to use many of them for the challenge and kill two birds with one stone by making my way through items in the kindle. The 23rd book, Us by David Nicholls, is one such example.  Being a majorly adoring fan of Nichols’ last book (One Day), I was excited to read this one.

My first impression was that it wasn’t as good as One Day (but I LOVED that book so much I was sad for days after finishing it).  The plot line was very different and the characters as well.  In Us, Nichols tells the story of Douglas and Connie, a long-time married couple.  Douglas is shocked when Connie announces she’d like a divorce just before their son Albie is about to move out of the house and venture out on his own.  Even so, the family of three decides to go on a Grand Tour of Europe before their son moves out.  The couple decide not to discuss their potential split up while on the trip.

If it sounds like a recipe for disaster, that’s because it is.  Albie is your typical fiction teenager – surly, uninterested, etc.  Sometimes I really dislike the way they write teenagers in books.  I know many teenagers are little jerks but they’re not always the same stereotype of horrible.  In Albie’a case, he seemed disinterested only in his father and would make fun of him, along with his mother.

The book has two stories happening: the breakdown of the marriage and then the search for Albie, who leave his parents in mid-vacation.  Souglas decides he needs to try to find him to mend their relationship.  At this point in the story (about halfway), it was unclear whether the book’s focus was the marriage or the parent/child relationship.

Speaking of the marriage, however, it seemed that Douglas and Connie were very mismatched.  The narration goes back and forth between past and present, showing how they met.  Even as a younger couple, they seem to love each other but possibly not really like each other (if that makes any sense at all!).  Douglas even mentions that Connie had an affair six months into their marriage and yet he is still completely shocked when she reveals she wants a divorce many years later.  Now as someone whose never been married, I can’t speak to the realism of their relationship and the complexities of a marriage, but I can assume that Nicholls has it mostly correct, being as one the things I like best about his writing are his characters.

However, the marriage problems fade and the father-son relationship between Douglas and Albie takes center-stage.  I suppose this is the ambiguity of the title – “us” can refer to any manner of “uses” including more than two people.  Ultimately the book is about the changing dynamics of relationships.

While reading, I took to the narrator.  Even though at times he could be stubborn, he was a like able guy and it was frustrating when his wife and son would hang up on him throughout the story.  However, his intentions throughout the entire book are good and he spends much of it trying to fix a mistake he makes in not coming to his son’s defense at a certain point.  Though this book did not have the “I can’t do anything but read this!” quality, I did enjoy it.

Other Posts in this Series:
Book # 22: A Book with a Love Triangle – Euphoria, by Lily King
Book # 21: A Book Set in Your Hometown – The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells, by Andrew Sean Greer
Book # 20: A Book with Nonhuman Characters – Gods Behaving Badly, by Marie Phillips
Book # 19: Nonfiction – Gumption, by Nick Offerman
Book # 18: A Book Set During Christmastime – A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens
Book # 17: A Popular Author’s First Book – Carrie, by Stephen King
Book # 16: A Book Based Entirely on It’s Cover – Paper Towns, by John Green
Book # 15: A Book Your Mom Loves – Gone Girl, by Gillian Flynn
Book # 14: A Book Set in a Place You Want to Visit – Beautiful Ruins, by Jess Walter
Book # 13: A Book with a Number in the Title – Eleven, by Mark Watson
Book # 12: A Book by an Author You’ve Never Read – Let’s Cure Diabetes with Owls, by David Sedaris
Book # 11: A Book with a Color in the Title – One Lavender Ribbon, by Heather Burch
Book # 10: A Book at the Bottom of Your To-Read List – If You Were Here, by Jen Lancaster
Book # 9: A Book Set in a Different Country – The Secret Place, by Tana French
Book # 8: A Book with Antonyms in the Title – Together Apart, by Natalie Martin
Book # 7: A Book Set in the Future – Cinder, by Marissa Meyer
Book # 6: A Book By a Female Author – We Have Always Lived in the Castle, by Shirley Jackson
Book # 5: A Book More Than 100 Years Old – The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, by L. Frank Baum
Book # 4: A Play – Pygmalion, by George Bernard Shaw
Book # 3: A Book You Started But Never Finished – The Husband’s Secret, by Liane Moriarty
Book # 2: A Mystery or Thriller – The Silence That Speaks, by Andrea Kane
Book # 1: A Book Published This Year – The Glass Kitchen, by Linda Francis Lee